The Most Physically Active Majors at The University of Texas

For some academic departments at The University of Texas, doing homework means working out, whether that’s sweating under the bright stage lights of a dance auditorium or backpacking through the Western United States to study field geology. If you like learning hands-on, check out these areas of study at UT that incorporate physical activity into academic objectives.

Geological Sciences

Jackson School of Geosciences

photo credit: Facebook.com/UTJSG

Undergraduate students entering the Jackson School of Geosciences are out in the field even before classes begin. The school’s NeoGeo trip takes freshman on a two-day excursion through Texas state parks, where they learn about the landscape and become acquainted with their peers. Once they return to campus, however, Geoscience students aren’t confined to the classroom for long. Throughout their four years, they’ll have research opportunities that allow them to embark on physically challenging excursions, from conducting projects while camping in Grand Teton National Park to collecting data on small vessels in the Gulf of Mexico.

Kinesiology and Health Science

College of Education
photo credit: Twitter.com/UTexasKHE

photo credit: Twitter.com/UTexasKHE

The Department of Kinesiology and Health Science at UT is one of the best in the nation. In addition to picking a specific major within the department, undergraduates have a variety of specializations to choose from, including coaching, health fitness instruction, and strength and conditioning. These specializations are a cluster of classes worth 18 hours that allow students to pursue careers that run that gamut from personal training to coaching professional athletics.

Dance

College of Fine Art
photo credit: Facebook.com/uttad

photo credit: Facebook.com/uttad

In the dance program at UT’s College of Fine Arts, one classroom session might be more physically demanding than some people’s gym workouts. Students must complete four years of training in ballet and contemporary dance as well as theoretical courses, including choreography and performance. Even undergrads will be working with the best in the biz, collaborating with renowned guest artists and participating in the school’s award-winning dance company.

Marine and Freshwater Science

College of Natural Sciences
photo credit: Sarah Cunningham, Facebook.com/utmsi

photo credit: Sarah Cunningham, Facebook.com/utmsi

Getting your feet wet in the world of marine science requires, well, getting wet. That’s why UT has a year-round Marine Science Institute located on Mustang Island between the Corpus Christi Bay and Gulf of Mexico. There, students take courses like Aquatic Microbiology and Physiology of Fishes, which require diving, boating and spending time at the beach. (Sounds rough, right?) Additionally, through the school’s Marine Science Club and outreach programs, students take scuba diving trips, help clean up lakes and rivers and volunteer at the Animal Rehabilitation Keep.